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UK Wide Talent Retention Solution - What can it do for you?

Posted on Tue, 24 Jan 2012 09:25

Business Secretary Vince Cable met Allan Cook, Chairman of the Skills and Jobs Retention Group yesterday, together with representatives from BAE Systems, Rolls Royce and Nissan.

The Group has created the Talent Retention Solution (TRS), a website that holds details of engineering staff at risk of redundancy and vacancies in the engineering sectors. This is good news for engineers looking for work, for companies looking to recruit and for the UK as a way of retaining vital skills for the benefit of growing sectors in engineering such as aerospace, automotive, renewables, marine and nuclear.

 

The Business Secretary Vince Cable said:

"I was pleased to hear today from Allan Cook, and representatives of leading engineering companies about progress in the development of the Talent Retention Solution, which the government helped business to create. The TRS provides a way for advanced manufacturing and engineering companies to recruit engineers quickly.

"It supports UK economic growth by ensuring that sectors who are winning business and recruiting can secure vital engineering talent from companies that are in a different economic cycle. I encourage engineering firms to take advantage of this important opportunity to add to their skillsets, and particularly SMEs for who the service is free."

 

Allan Cook said:

"I continue to be encouraged and delighted with the level of support for the TRS across all engineering sectors, from large, medium and small engineering firms to trade associations and the UNITE union. This is the first national system to support the redeployment and retention of engineering talent."

The TRS was launched in July 2011, and was supported by a grant from the UKCES in 2011. It is now fully self-financing in the private sector. It is a redeployment and retention tool. To date 345 UK companies have registered on the TRS. The number of vacancies on the system is growing quickly - there are 500+ live vacancies today, and the system currently holds details of 690 people. All of these numbers are expected to continue to grow quickly over the next few months. The system is devoted entirely to the needs of recruitment in the engineering sectors.

The original article can be seen on the Aerospace, Aviation and Defence Knowledge Transfer Network here

Institution of Mechanical Engineers report on Vince Cable praising TRS

Posted on Mon, 23 Jan 2012 11:30

Back in October, the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, top engineering companies and Government joined forces on the Talent Retention Solution (TRS) which was designed to help engineers facing redundancy link up to companies who are looking for engineering skills. The system - which is free to use for individuals and SMEs - is backed by Government and top companies like BAE Systems, Airbus, EADS, EdF, Siemens, NISSAN, Rolls-Royce, GKN, WS Atkins, as a way of retaining vital skills in the  UK for the benefit of growing sectors in engineering such as aerospace, automotive, renewables, marine and nuclear.

Yesterday, Business Secretary Vince Cable met Allan Cook, Chairman of the Skills and Jobs Retention Group, together with representatives from BAE Systems, Rolls- Royce and Nissan.

The Business Secretary Vince Cable said:

"I was pleased to hear today from Allan Cook and representatives of leading engineering companies about progress in the development of the Talent Retention Solution, which the government helped business to create. The TRS provides a way for advanced manufacturing and engineering companies to recruit engineers quickly.

"It supports UK economic growth by ensuring that sectors who are winning business and recruiting can secure vital engineering talent from companies that are in a different economic cycle.  I encourage engineering firms to take advantage of this important opportunity to add to their skillsets, and particularly SMEs for who the service is free."

Allan Cook said: "I continue to be encouraged and delighted with the level of support for the TRS across all engineering sectors, from large, medium and small engineering firms to trade associations and the UNITE union. This is the first national system to support the redeployment and retention of engineering talent."

"It is very clear that there is real demand for engineering skills in the market which is reflected in the success of TRS. The system is already fully operational and working well. Many of the larger and medium sized engineering companies are actively engaged, but it is relevant to all companies in the supply chain with demand for engineering skills or where there is, unfortunately, a need to engage with companies where employee numbers are reducing due to market forces.

Stephen Tetlow, Chief Executive of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers said: "Without the right skills the UK’s economy cannot prosper, so during the current economic climate it is more important than ever to work together to redeploy and retain talent in the UK."

"This tool helps link up those who have found themselves facing redundancy with top employers around the country who are desperately looking to recruit engineers. It’s good news for engineers looking for work, for companies looking to recruit and for the country as a whole as a way of retaining crucial skills needed to get the economy back on its feet."

The service is free for SMEs with employee numbers less than 500, so they can benefit from the system at no cost. For all companies interested in engineering recruitment, this is an opportunity not to be missed - for more details and to sign up to the TRS see the website:

The original article can be read on the Institute of Mechanical Engineers website here 

Business Secretary Vince Cable Praises UK Wide Talent Retention Solution

Posted on Thu, 19 Jan 2012 12:22

Business Secretary Vince Cable met Allan Cook, Chairman of the Skills and Jobs Retention Group yesterday, together with representatives from BAE Systems, Rolls-Royce and Nissan.

The Group has created the Talent Retention Solution (TRS), a website that holds details of engineering staff at risk of redundancy and vacancies in the engineering sectors. This is good news for engineers looking for work, for companies looking to recruit and for the UK as a way of retaining vital skills for the benefit of growing sectors in engineering such as aerospace, automotive, renewables, marine and nuclear.

 

The Business Secretary Vince Cable said:

"I was pleased to hear today from Allan Cook and representatives of leading engineering companies about progress in the development of the Talent Retention Solution, which the government helped business to create. The TRS provides a way for advanced manufacturing and engineering companies to recruit engineers quickly."

"It supports UK economic growth by ensuring that sectors who are winning business and recruiting can secure vital engineering talent from companies that are in a different economic cycle.  I encourage engineering firms to take advantage of this important opportunity to add to their skillsets, and particularly SMEs for who the service is free."

 

Allan Cook said:

"I continue to be encouraged and delighted with the level of support for the TRS across all engineering sectors, from large, medium and small engineering firms to trade associations and the UNITE union. This is the first national system to support the redeployment and retention of engineering talent.

It is very clear that there is real demand for engineering skills in the market which is reflected in the success of TRS. The system is already fully operational and working well. Many of the larger and medium sized engineering companies are actively engaged, but it is relevant to all companies in the supply chain with demand for engineering skills or where there is, unfortunately, a need to engage with companies where employee numbers are reducing due to market forces.

The service is free for SMEs with employee numbers less than 500, so they can benefit from the system at no cost. For all companies interested in engineering recruitment, this is an opportunity not to be missed - for more details and to sign up to the TRS see the website www.talentretention.biz.

 

Background

1.  The TRS was launched in July 2011, and was supported by a grant from the UKCES in 2011. It is now fully self-financing in the private sector.  It is a redeployment and retention tool.  To date 345 UK companies have registered on the TRS.  The number of vacancies on the system is growing quickly - there are 500+ live vacancies today, and the system currently holds details of 690 people.  All of these numbers are expected to continue to grow quickly over the next few months. The system is devoted entirely to the needs of recruitment in the engineering sectors.

2.  Allan Cook, Chairman of WS Atkins is also Chairman of the Skills and Jobs Retention Group. This was set up to help redeploy and retain vitally needed engineering skills that might be put at risk as a result of changes arising from the Strategic Defence and Security Review.  The system is now available to engineers at risk in all of the advanced manufacturing and engineering sectors, and across the UK.

Talent Retention Solution mentioned in the House of Lords (extract from Hansard)

Posted on Thu, 22 Dec 2011 15:22

The Talent Retention Solution has been mentioned a number of times in various debates in the House of Lords this month. On the 5th December in answer to an Aerospace Industry Question asked by Lord Soley to ask Her Majesty’s Government what discussions they have had with the aerospace industry regarding problems facing that industry. Lord Jenkin of Roding responded as follows, 'My Lords, we are extremely grateful to the noble Lord, Lord Haskel, for giving us the opportunity to debate this subject. I am going to follow him on skills in a moment but, with regard to what the Ministers are saying, I can only imagine that he has not read the report of the all-party manufacturing group held last month, at which my noble friend Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint answered a great many of the points that he has made about small businesses and exports. The central point that he made was that of course the Government and UKTI have to do more, but there needs to be a change of attitude on the part of small companies.

I need no persuasion about the importance of manufacturing industry. Before I went into the House of Commons I spent 13 years in the chemical industry, and I have always felt that it is a great pity that there are not more Members of another place who have done the same sort of thing. I turn to skills. My honourable friend John Hayes, the Minister for Skills and Training, is doing a splendid job in grappling with the situation that he inherited. In particular, he has recognised, as I am not sure our predecessors did, that if you are going to have more apprenticeships and skills councils, they must be employer-led. That is what is now happening. Those skills councils that have been employer-led have been very successful. I shall mention only two of them: Cogent, which deals with the skills and training for many of the STEM industries, and the National Skills Academy for Nuclear-I declare an interest as its honorary president. They are now wholly independent of public finance because they are now being financed by industry. That should be applauded. Yet one hears of so many problems regarding the lack of skills. Another of my interests that I should declare is that I am honorary president of the Energy Industries Council. That is the trade association that represents more than 650 companies in the energy supply chains, including a large number of small and medium-sized enterprises. It holds trade shows around the world. Last month my noble friend Lord Howell of Guildford was pleased to visit a two-day trade fair that the EIC was running at Olympia, and only last week he did the same at a trade fair in Dubai. On both occasions he was hugely impressed by the quality and range of the manufactures that are available from the companies that were exhibiting on the stands, but on both occasions my noble friend heard the same complaint: that they cannot get the skills and the skilled people necessary to deliver the export orders that they are now getting from around the world. I heard the same point at another meeting. A speaker on behalf of Centrica made exactly the same point: it cannot get the skilled labour. Yet, as we know and grieve, more than 1 million young people aged 18 to 26 are described as NEETs-not in education, employment or training. What are the barriers? Why can this not happen? Is it attitudes? Yes, that is certainly one of those barriers. Is it reluctance on the part of employers? Possibly. However, the biggest barrier-I heard this the other day from the vice-chancellor of the Open University, who was extremely persuasive-is a lack of proper information and careers advice to young people. Many of them do not know about the opportunities that are open to them to gain skills and so begin to qualify for jobs for life. What is my noble friend's department doing to strengthen the provision of information to young people? A major new project is emerging in Yorkshire-what will be the world's biggest potash mine. It involves an investment of £3 billion and 1,000 new jobs, all of which will need to be skilled. What is the company doing? It is going into the schools and the further education colleges in order to persuade the students there of the importance of gaining skills so that, when the company starts to recruit people, they will be able to operate the equipment. Last night I heard a very interesting comment on this from the former chief executive of the Association for Science Education, who said:
"That would not have happened 10 years ago".
There has been a significant change in attitude, but many more companies need to do that. I end by offering a bouquet to my noble friend. The department's Talent Retention Scheme, which was launched by my honourable friend Mark Prisk, is a scheme whereby skilled people who are losing their jobs can be picked up by other firms that are looking for people. Participation in the scheme is beginning to grow but I wish that more companies would subscribe to it. I hope that my noble friend will be able to confirm that.
The full text can be read here

At the official opening of the Energy Training Service Training Centre, Lord Willis encourages registration for TRS

Posted on Thu, 22 Dec 2011 14:51

The official opening of the Energy Service Training Centre in Newcastle on November 22 by Siemens Energy Service was a great success. Lord Willis of Knaresborough took the time to encourage individuals to register for the Talent Retention Solution of which Siemens is a key sponsor. It is the first strategic initiative of its kind dedicated to the engineering and manufacturing sector UK wide and will help skills retention and talent transfer across the industry. Thanks were given by Siemens to attendees for continuing to support their efforts to build a pipeline of engineering skills in the UK. The image shows from left to right, Graham Hartley, Managing Director of Energy Service UK, Lord Willis of Knaresborough and Matthew Chinn, Managing Director of Energy Sector UK SCL North West Europe

Talent Retention Scheme attracts growing number of SME's

Posted on Tue, 18 Oct 2011 13:27 by Marine Information Hub. Source: marineSouthEast.co

The recently announced Talent Retention Solution (TRS), is a new national web based system which helps match skilled employees facing redundancy to UK companies (including SME's) in growing sectors of advanced manufacturing and engineering who are recruiting.

The new scheme has been attracting growing numbers of SME's signing up to the initiative.

Marine South East, working with Winchester Consulting are key partners in delivering this initiative for marine companies.

The easy to use system comes as a result of work undertaken by the Skills and Jobs Retention Group (SJRG) to support the advanced engineering manufacturing sector - engineers who may be struggling to find work in today's difficult economic climate.

Manufacturing and engineering companies which have already signed up to the system and who are recruiting over the coming year include Rolls Royce (1000), Siemens (500), Nissan (200) and Airbus (600). Supply chain companies will also be able to use the system for redeployment and recruitment.

Link to original article on Marine South East is here

New initiative launched to retain highly skilled employees across advanced manufacturing and engineering sectors

Posted on Tue, 18 Oct 2011 13:25 by Marine Information Hub. Source: marineSouthEast.co

Mark Prisk, Minister for Business recently announced the launch of a new national web based system, Talent Retention Solution (TRS), which will help match skilled employees facing redundancy to UK companies (including SME's) in growing sectors of advanced manufacturing and engineering who are recruiting.

Marine South East, working with Winchester Consulting will be key partners in delivering this initiative for marine companies.

The easy to use system comes as a result of work undertaken by the Skills and Jobs Retention Group (SJRG) to support the advanced engineering manufacturing sector - engineers who may be struggling to find work in today's difficult economic climate.

Manufacturing and engineering companies which have already signed up to the system and who are recruiting over the coming year include Rolls Royce (1000), Siemens (500), Nissan (200) and Airbus (600). Supply chain companies will also be able to use the system for redeployment and recruitment.

The original article published on Marine Information Hub can be seen here.

Talent Retention Finds its Solution Online

Posted on Tue, 18 Oct 2011 13:09 by The Manufacturer Source: TheManufacturer.com

As the defence sector declines following government spending cuts, Nissan and Siemens support the launch of a new system to ensure valuable skills are retained within the manufacturing sector.

Nissan and Siemens yesterday initiated a new recruitment system in north-east England which matches defence workers who are facing redundancy to alternative career opportunities in engineering and advanced manufacturing.

Skills shortages are a common concern for manufacturing companies. But while apprenticeships have been targeted by government as a root to recruiting new talent into the sector the loss of existing skills when individual sub-sectors shrink is a major and immediate problem.

Ian Godden, CEO of ADS the trade association for defence and aerospace companies in the UK, has said that he anticipate 20,000-30,000 jobs will be lost in the defence sector over the next 3-5years.

The Talent Retention Solution (TRS) is a web-based service developed by the Skills and Jobs Retention Group (SJRG) in paternership with manufacturing sector skills council, Semta.

Nissan and Siemens are both memebers of SJRG and have committed to sponsiring the TRS.

Senior representatives from Nissan, Siemens and Semta, including the SSC’s chairman and industry veteran, Allan Cook, are personally involved in promoting TRS.

Manufacturing and engineering enterprises in the North East region were welcomed to a launch event for the TRS at Gateshead College's new Skills Academy for Sustainable Manufacturing and Innovation.

Allan Cook, CBE said of the new web service: “This new web based talent retention system will assist businesses in the high growth engineering and manufacturing sector to recruit the staff they need to compete successfully in the international market.

“With leading companies like Nissan and Siemens partnering, we have true employer ownership to solve a problem affecting the public and private sectors and the talented people they employ.”

TRS will become fully operational by January 2012.

The link to the original article in The Manufacturer can be seen here.

The MIA welcomes the Talent Retention Solution - a new system to retain highly-skilled UK engineering employees

Posted on Wed, 12 Oct 2011 13:23 by Motorsport Industry Association

At present, the demand for skilled engineers far exceeds supply. The new Talent Retention Solution (TRS) will complement existing commercial recruitment activity by, initially, creating a talent pool of skilled defence employees who need redeployment, says the British Government. This is a free service, to companies with fewer than 500 employees, created to retain highly skilled employees from defence, advanced manufacturing and engineering’

“This is excellent news for Motorsport Valley” said Chris Aylett, CEO of the Motorsport Industry Association (MIA) this week, “Many motorsport companies are growing so fast, yet are held back, as they can’t find the high quality engineering staff needed to meet global demand for their products. The UK’s defence industry, facing significant cutbacks due to budget reductions, is host to some of the very best engineers in the world. I am sure they will add strength in depth to our world beating motorsport industry”.

The easy to use website, Talent Retention Solution (TRS), helps match skilled employees facing redundancy, with UK companies in growing sectors, such as motorsport and high performance engineering. TRS has government funding for set up costs, and, from January 2012, will then be fully funded by business subscriptions from larger companies.

Initially, it will connect highly-skilled, engineers from the defence sector, who are seeking redeployment , with those engineering companies who are recruiting.

TRS will become fully operational by January 2012, when over 1500 employers across the UK are expected to have signed up to the system, and it will provide live data broken down by skills and geography. The intention is to expand the scope of TRS to help redeploy skilled employees from across the UK’s advanced engineering sectors, becoming a particularly important tool where large scale redundancies are occurring. Rolls-Royce, BAE Systems, Nissan, Siemens, Airbus and EDF are already signed up to TRS.

Launching the Talent Retention Solution, Minister for Business and Enterprise Mark Prisk said:  "The defence sector makes a substantial contribution to the country’s skills economy through high value jobs...The easily accessible TRS system will play a vital role, ensuring  these skills are not lost , by redeploying highly skilled workers into fast growing sectors of advanced engineering”

The original feature was published on the MIA website and can be viewed here

Government launches Talent Retention Solution in bid to salvage skills

Posted on Wed, 12 Oct 2011 13:21 by Max Gosney for Works Managament

The government has launched a dating style web service, the Talent Retention Solution (TRS), to match skilled workers facing redundancy with manufacturers looking to recruit.

The TRS will initially focus on retaining skills from the defence sector, which is braced for heavy job cuts.

Business minister, Mark Prisk, said: "This is about talent retention. We want to make sure we don't see a specialist industry hit problems, shed staff and those workers change career completely or go abroad where we lose them from UK engineering."

The TRS could be used to salvage skills under threat at train manufacturer Bombardier, Prisk confirmed.

"It's a little early to pre judge what Bombardier will or won't do...but if individuals were made redundant this helps enormously by opening up a huge range of opportunities."

Bombardier has annouced upto 1500 job losses at its Derby site. Meanwhile BAE Systems will shed 2000 staff in the wake of defence spending cuts.

Employees could be redeployed to suitable jobs in sister manufacturing sectors under the TRS.

Rolls-Royce, Siemens, Nissan and Airbus have signed up to the scheme's pilot as they look to fill over 2,000 vacancies.

Over 1,500 companies could have enrolled when TRS goes fully operational next January, the government said.

The scheme has been developed by Semta and the Skills and Jobs retention group. TRS will be self funded by industry from its full launch in January.

Original Feature was published on Works Management and can be viewed here

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UNIVERSITIES

TRS is currently at various stages of working with over 40 universities; others are expected to participate and promote TRS throughout 2013.

TRS has a growing network of employers who will progressively be using TRS to advertise their graduate and internship vacancies to view and apply for.

FURTHER EDUCATION COLLEGES

TRS is a new industry approach to working with UK Further Education Colleges and employers to support and promote the recruitment and retention of skilled people into UK advanced manufacturing and engineering (AME) jobs.
See current vacancies